None of us wants to hear such things as career decline. And when it comes to music, it is even worse to hear such. As a musician, I always want to be on top of my game, and that is why I burn my midnight oil writing songs, studying the things other musicians in the industry are doing, keeping tabs on my social media, and trying to find out what interests my fans more. All these things and, of course, many others, I do them to ensure that my music career remains to be on an upward trend. And for the five years I have been in the entertainment industry, I have been through ups and downs, and I know what it means for a music career to be on the decline. From experience, my music career will be on the verge of collapse if it depicts the following signs.

I No Longer Pull Huge Crowds

As a musician, I’m a celebrity, and I expect crowds to follow me everywhere I go. Yes, I can’t expect to pull large crowds every time I’m attending an event- perhaps there is something the event organizers did not get right- but when it is happening every now and again, then I have to ask myself questions. For instance, if I’m scheduled to perform at a particular event and the event has been publicized so well, then I expect many people to attend the event. If I enter the venue and find only a few people there despite the information being in the public domain, then that is a sign that my career is declining.

I’m Losing Clients

Losing clients is a normal thing, especially when I consider the fact that better musicians are coming up with better stuff. A typical music client always wants the best deals, and if I lose clients occasionally on such basis, then I consider that normal. However, if the rate at which I’m losing clients is higher than the rate at which I’m winning new clients, then I consider that as a sign of career decline. As musicians, clients are the people who keep us going, and let’s not deceive ourselves that we’re not in the business to make money. Thus, if we are not being invited to perform at events and functions more often than we used to, then we should do something just in time to save our music career.

I’m Out of My Creative Juices

Good music is all about creativity, and our music career will be headed for extinction the moment we stop being creative. Our fans expect to see us come up with new stuff more often, but if they see us regurgitating ideas, then their interest in buying and listening to our music will definitely go down. I want to salute songwriters out there because these people are a blessing to  the music industry. Of course, most of us don’t write our own music and have these people to thank for the good work. Even though we pay them, they surely deserve to earn from their ability to create interesting pieces.

Lack of creativity also may mean that I take too long to release music pieces. If I’m giving my fans a break of, say, one year, chances are that they will switch loyalty, and it may take some good work to win them back. But that doesn’t mean I can just release any music piece. It must be fully baked since I don’t want to be on the receiving end of shoddy work accusations.

My Social Media Popularity Is Going Down

Social media, especially Facebook and Twitter, is where I meet most of my fans, and a decline in the following is actually a bad signal. When I post on my social media, I expect my fans to react overwhelmingly. This gives me confidence that they are still following me.

My Music Is No Longer Being Air Played More Often

Whenever I release a new hit, it has always been played in the mainstream media, including radio and TV multiple times a day. When that changes, however, then it is a wakeup call for me to do something about my music career.

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